Categories / Fine Arts

Different Strokes

Seeking really good storyboard inspiration when this 50’s design dropped out of the clouds. Unknown author

Yusaku Kamekura

They refer to him as the Grandfather of Japanese Graphic Design. Yusaku Kamekura is considered one of Japanese greatest first generation designers.

Uncompromising perfectionist, visionary and the profession’s first undisputed leader, Yusaku Kamekura worked all his life to shape his reputation.

Groningen

Enjoying these fleeting moments of a city. It’s Groningen Netherlands.

This is the very first project by Groningen based arts duo DocterSterkenburg. Christiaan Docter is a filmcomposer and Jonathan Sterkenburg is a cinematographer. This very first project is a tribute to the city of Groningen, Netherlands

Hat tip to @brainpicker

20:50 at the Saatchi Gallery

RW

Slick oil: Richard Wilson’s 20:50 at the Saatchi Gallery. A walkway invites visitors directly through the tank, so that they are surrounded by the reflective plane of oil. It’s an amazing spectacle.

Daring Mystery 8

Wow. Now I’m hunting down an original.

Daring Mystery #8 (January 1942) art by Jack Kirby

Daring Mystery had a rather sporadic schedule.

Issue #7 came out seven months after the previous issue and it would take an additional nine months for #8 to be released. What a difference an issue made. Daring Mystery #6 was produced shortly after Simon and Kirby started working for Timely. It included a Fiery Mask story, a hero Joe Simon created for Timely as a freelance artist when he had just started in the comic book business. DM #7 came out shortly after Captain America #1, Simon and Kirby’s first big hit. Issue #8 came out the same month as Cap #10, after which Simon and Kirby moved on to working for DC.

Props to kirbymuseum.org

Zen Ties

Original and inspiring children’s book called Zen Ties. Glorious watercolour illustrations with stunning portraits and unexpected haiku poetry, punctuating the story with zest and zeal.

Expect Excellence

If you are going to achieve excellence in big things, you develop the habit in little matters.

Excellence is not an exception, it is a prevailing attitude.”~ Colin Powell

Refreshing

Enjoying the art with this exceptionally good quote:

If you are going to achieve excellence in big things, you develop the habit in little matters. Excellence is not an exception, it is a prevailing attitude.”~ Colin Powell

Thanks to nolola for the props – sweet image for a graphic tee.

Francis Bacon

Francis

Excited to view his new exhibition at the Met.

Britain’s bad-boy painter.

Self-taught, controversial, and revered, Francis Bacon was one of the most talented figurative painters of the 20th century. This year, a major traveling retrospective marks the centenary of his birth.

He left home at 16. Banished by his father after being caught wearing his mother’s clothes, Bacon drifted between London, Berlin, and Paris for the next several years — surviving as a gambler and hustler.

Bacon got his start as a designer. He first gained notoriety for his modernist furniture and rugs, but quickly abandoned that career to focus on painting surreal, fragmented subjects, based on found photographs and reproductions.

He immortalized his fellow barflies. From the ’60s onward, Bacon painted twisted visions of his inner circle of drinking pals, including his lover George Dyer, who he first met when Dyer burglarized Bacon’s pad.

View work from Bacon’s traveling retrospective (and visit the exhibition in New York), read three classic interviews, watch video of the artist from the BBC archives, and buy the exhibition catalogue.

Via Paul Laster from FlavourPill

Long Distance Runner

Poster

Poster

1960’s release for the classic British movie. It’s easy to say that this is way closer to art than commerce. Modern movie poster design now is one of the most critical instruments in defining/establishing the target audience, wrapping emotional messaging and plot devices into an image that drives the marketing machine. The top poster seems so damn quaint comparatively.

Harald Naegeli

Harald Naegeli

Harald Naegeli – Swiss artist best known for his graffiti-like paintings. The authorities of Zürich at long last recognized Naegeli’s graffiti as art. The city restored one of the very few of his surviving graffiti in Zürich: Undine was created in 1978 on a building of the University of Zürich, located at Schönberggasse 9. When the building was renovated from 1995 to 2004, the graffito was considered valuable art by the building department and covered to protect it for the duration of the work.

Harald Naegeli

Naegeli from 1984, showing him at Lörrach in the company of Beuys when he turned himself in to the Swiss police.

Swiss Police

Woody Allen + Jean-Luc Godard

Curious little video documentary from 1986 with Woody Allen.

One of the least remarked upon attributes of Jean-Luc Godard is how thoroughly he mastered the medium of video production. For him Video was not a mere substitute for film, but something separate and distinct, an aesthetic platform all its own to which he brought a heretofore unrevealed dimension in his art; one that subtly informed the work he would later do once he returned to Cinema.

It is, however, somewhat understandable that this pocket of his career should be so little known, given that his extended video works of the 1970s . . . Six fois deux, for example, or the remarkable France/Tour/Detour/Deux/Enfants . . . continue to languish in the limited access obscurity into which they landed with a thud virtually from the hour of their creation. There are those in the fundamentally class-based universe of cinephilia who would not have it any other way, however. I mean, don’t let’s kid ourselves here. There is, and always has been, a vast amount of social comfort to be derived for Us (the cinephile class) if You (the vulgar herd) have no access to the works we get to see in the cinephile dungeons of large urban centers (after all, if We can’t use film to construct a bizarro-world recreation of High School where we are no longer the geeks we once were then, I ask you, what is the point in all of this?).

So Jean-Luc Godard’s video creations remain militantly inaccessible by all but the small number who’ve been fortunate enough to see them. And more than any of these works, 1986’s Meetin’ WA stands as testament to the extraordinary facility he developed with this sub-medium; a faciility harder-achieved in the 70s, when video production was a far more dolorous and taxing enterprise than it is today.

At once sublime and witty, the 26 minutes of Meetin’ WA consist of an interview Jean-Luc Godard conducted in 1986 with Woody Allen, the director of What’s Up, Tigerlilly and Men of Crisis: The Harvey Wallinger Story (and soon to be featured in the final moments of Godard’s abortive Cannon Pictures’ King Lear). The chat itself is amiable enough; certainly avoiding any conceivable adversarial notes; but this, along with the New York setting (giving Allen the home field advantage as it were) does nothing to prevent a visible anxiety from growing on the part of the filmmaker as the interview goes on.

It’s as if it dawned on Allen, right in the middle of everything, that this tape could be . . . used . . . in some way he would not be able to control, that he was talking to a man who long ago demonstrated that he would not be bound to a standard not his own. Gradually, almost anticipating this development, Godard’s camera moves in closer and closer, Allen’s eyes dart back and forth between Godard and his translator (film scholar Annette Innsdorf) while questions are asked, the expression on his face bordering at times on open worry; like he’s waiting, with only marginal patience, for some sign of what it is he’s gotten himself into to manifest itself. It is, perhaps, the only occasion where Woody Allen seems as neurotic as the persona he wrote for himself was always said to be.

Grail Geometry

Grail - Goya

No evidence has yet emerged that Renaissance and Baroque painters encoded secret messages into their works. We have of course, The Da Vinci Code to thank for the recent uptick in this sort of thing. The Grail Geometry used to compose paintings is explained here

Goya - Hexagon

The Grail Geometry is a hexagonal geometry — involving the hexagram (6–pointed star — “Seal of Solomon” — “Star of David”) and the equilateral triangle and the multiples and divisors of the associated hexagram angle of sixty (60) degrees; — as opposed to the pentagonal geometry — involving the pentagram (the 5–pointed star of, for example, “Vitruvian Man”) and it involves the “divine proportion” (other names include “golden section” and “golden ratio” and the Greek letter PHI for the ratio 1.618 to 1) and the multiples and the divisors of the associated pentagram angle of seventy-two (72) degrees.

Geometry